Sidney Crosby the latest NHL player diagnosed with the mumps – fully vaccinated

Sidney Crosby is the biggest name yet to be added to the NHL’s growing list of players who have contracted the mumps.

The Pittsburgh Penguins announced Sunday that Crosby, their second-leading scorer, was the 13th NHL player to be diagnosed with the virus. The two-time MVP was held out of weekend games against the Calgary Flames and the Columbus Blue Jackets as a precaution. The 27-year-old had developed significant swelling to the right side of his face.

The team originally believed that the swelling was related to a salivary gland injury that Crosby sustained in a Nov. 29 matchup against the Carolina Hurricanes.

Continue reading Sidney Crosby the latest NHL player diagnosed with the mumps – fully vaccinated

UD Mumps Outbreak NOT Tied To Low Vaccination Rates

UD Mumps Outbreak Not Tied To Low Vaccination Rates.                                           In other words, they ARE tied to HIGH Vaccination rates.

By APRIL LAISSLE

9 students at the University of Dayton have confirmed cases of the mumps and another 23 have shown symptoms. All but one of those students was fully vaccinated against the infection.
All UD students are required to receive the MMR vaccine, which protects against Mumps, Measles and Rubella, before starting classes — unless a medical condition prevents them from getting it.

Donna Youtz, the immunization coordinator with Public Health Dayton and Montgomery County, says the vaccine isn’t 100% percent effective.

“It’s about 88 percent effective if they get two doses,” said Youtz. “And other than that we really don’t know why it’s not working as well as we had hoped.”

Yutz says high immunization rates help to contain the spread of the disease.

Mumps is viral infection that causes swelling of the glands, fever, and muscle aches. Outbreaks are more likely to occur is places where people are in close contact. Similar outbreaks have occurred recently at Ohio State, Fordham, and Harvard.

http://wyso.org/post/ud-mumps-outbreak-not-tied-low-vaccination-rates#stream/0

 

Harvard Mumps Outbreak ‘students who are well-immunized’

Photo by midom

Harvard Mumps Outbreak ‘students who are well-immunized’

The Harvard Crimson is reporting that the University is now experiencing a “mumps outbreak.” The caveat, of course, is that the outbreak is amongst a “well-immunized” student body. Being that this is the second mumps “outbreak” being reported on college campuses around the nation and in both events, the recipients of mumps were vaccinated, you would almost think we would see the light. That is however not the case, in fact, the light is apparently a bulbless socket. According to The Harvard Crimson, affected students, are being relocated to other housing units.

Administrators at the College, Harvard University Health Services, and Cambridge Public Health Department are working to contain the spread of mumps and care for students who have been affected by the virus by relocating them to isolated housing for an extended period of time.

“We have officially an outbreak of mumps in this population,” HUHS Director Paul J. Barreira said. “It’s happening with students who are well-immunized, so it’s a breakthrough infection. So the task is to get the population to act in ways that minimizes the spread of the virus.”

Is the term “breakthrough infection” the most polite way of saying that the original two required MMR vaccines failed? The students are each required to be housed privately and use private bathrooms. HUHS Director Paul J. Barreira was asked if he felt a third booster should now be required. However, he responded saying there is no real evidence that would be effective. In this case, Harvard is merely considering the prior two MMR vaccines to be that of failures. Though I am happy to see that they aren’t attempting to push further vaccines into the mix as a reactionary solution (as we know, pharmaceuticals much enjoy reactionary solutions when it comes to vaccines).

Continue reading Harvard Mumps Outbreak ‘students who are well-immunized’