The Supreme Law of the Land

“Law of the Land”, “Due Course of Law” and “Due Process of Law” are synonymous. – People v. Skinner, Cal., 110 P.2d 41, 45; State v. Rossi, 71 R.I. 284, 43 A.2d 323, 326; Direct Plumbing Supply Co. v. City of Dayton, 138 Ohio St. 540, 38 N.E.2d 70, 72, 137 A.L.R.1058; Stoner v. Higginson, 316Pa.481, 175A. 527, 531

“All laws, rules and practices, which are repugnant to the Constitution, are null and void” – Marbury v. Madison, 5th U.S. (2 Cranch) 137, 180

“The general rule is that an unconstitutional statute, though having the form and name of law, is in reality no law; but, is wholly void and ineffective for any purpose, since its unconstitutionality dates from the time of its enactment… In legal contemplation, it is as inoperative as if it had never been passed… Since an unconstitutional law is void, the general principles follow that it imposes no duties, confers no right, creates no office, bestows no power or authority on anyone, affords no protection and justifies no acts performed under it… A void act cannot be legally consistent with a valid one. An unconstitutional law cannot operate to supersede any existing law. Indeed, insofar as a statute runs counter to the fundamental law of the land, (the Constitution), it is superseded thereby. No one is bound to obey an unconstitutional law; and, no courts are bound to enforce it.” – Bonnett v. Vallier, 116 N.W. 885, 136 Wis. 193 (1908); Norton v. Shelby County, 118 U.S. 425 (1886)

“…every man is independent of all laws, except those prescribed by nature. He is not bound by any institutions formed by his fellowman without his consent.” – Cruden v. Neale, 2 N.C. 338 (1796) 2 S.E.

“Under our system of government, upon the individuality and intelligence of the citizen, the state does not claim to control him/her, except as [to] his/her conduct to[wards] others, leaving him/her the sole judge as to all that affects himself/herself.” – Mugler v. Kansas 123 U.S. 623, 659-60

“Statutes that violate the plain and obvious principles of common right and common reason are null and void.” – Bennett v. Boggs, 1 Baldw 60

“The assertion of federal rights, when plainly and reasonably made, is not to be defeated under the name of local practice.” – Davis v. Wechsler, 263 US22, at 24.

“A State may not impose a charge for the enjoyment of a right granted by the Federal Constitution.” – Murdock v. Pennsylvania, 319 U.S. 105, at 113